I can’t ever recall a time in my life when I didn’t love ice cream. This sweet treat has been the sticky on my fingers, the cold on a hot day, and the sweet bliss on a moment leaving me hungry for more. Quite frankly I can’t imagine a time of day or night when ice cream isn’t appropriate. I’ve never understood folks who don’t enjoy ice cream, yet I never question it as it leaves a few more dips for my spoon.

The first attempt I had making this delicious dessert was in the fourth grade at Campbell Mountain Girl Scout Camp. We put our ingredients in an old coffee tin and shook it back and forth. This process was one of the more fun ways of churning the mix but still left our little arms exhausted.

Traditional ice cream is churned, a step that incorporates air and breaks up the ice crystals as they form around the mix, making the finished product a creamy smooth cream rather than one icy block. We could’ve churned 20 coffee cans and it wouldn’t have been enough for that hot afternoon. It seemed like it took forever before it was finally done. Even at a young age, we all recognized how special this creamy homemade dessert was and licked every bit to the last drop. To this day I look back on it as one of the most delicious ice creams I’ve ever had.

As wonderful as that process was, I’ve only used a coffee tin one time since. However, in the last ten years one of my best friends has easily been my ice cream machine. Everything tastes better with ice cream, or at least that’s my philosophy. But many times I don’t have enough time to make ice cream even with the machine.

Recently, I came across a no-churn recipe and method. I can’t begin to tell you how eager I was to give this recipe a whirl. It has not disappointed. It really is as simple as a few ingredients. It’s also incredibly cheap to make. The sweetened condensed milk and fluffy whipped cream combine and have a similar if not exact taste to ice cream. Just add flavor, fruit, crushed candy or cookies, whatever you’re hungry for and wallah, the results are so beautifully simple it is wonderful. But be careful, you can easily ended up with a freezer full of homemade ice cream.

In a separate bowl mix condensed milk, vanilla, and any other flavoring you may want to use or add. If using herbs or spices, steep condensed milk in a pan over medium heat for five minutes. If not, mix in fruit, sprinkles, nuts, or whatever you fancy.

Mix condensed milk mix and heavy whipping cream together. Place in container you wish to serve from such as a muffin tin, 9×5 loaf pan, pint size freezer container, or silicone baking molds.



The recipes and photo used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz ([email protected]).

We have all been that person at dinner who isn’t hungry, but can’t stop nibbling on the dips and spreads put out by our host. At a potluck earlier this week, I was totally that person. They may as well have given me my own bag of chips. By the time dinner was served my level of full had gone to stuffed. What is it about dips and spreads that is so irresistible? Some might say the presentation while others might say the dish itself. Either way, empty trays speak for themselves. Some might even say the start of the party determines the success of a party. My hostess was clever about pacing out the food. Her husband finished the grill work while appetizer and cocktail time for guests gave them a little bit of breathing space … time to put the finishing touches on dinner, mingle with guests, and sample a few things on the first course table. Appetizers can be as simple as a tray of veggies served with a creamy dip, or an enormous chunk of cheese and a basket of crackers. Whatever you decide to serve, unless you plan to make a meal of appetizers like I did, keep the quantity to a minimum. The object is to stimulate the appetite of your guests, not kill it.

Today I have included a few of my favorite dips and spreads for making ahead or serving immediately. I have also included details for serving with toast points and veggie dip. Many fine restaurants and casual ones serve toast points with appetizers. This recipe has helped me many times when I have been in a no crackers or chips pickle. Raw vegetable with dips make a beautiful centerpiece for the cocktail table or appetizer table. These recipes will help you think about the many options you have to create the presentation and flavor you are looking for.

Select a large platter or tray. Arrange one or two dunking bowls in the center. Add a layer of leaf lettuce to a base, and veggies (like the spokes of a wheel).

Use a loaf of thinly sliced sandwich bread. Cut each slice diagonally in both directions so that you have four triangular pieces of bread, or points.

Place the cut bread in a single layer on a cookie sheet. Bake in a 350 degree oven for 12-15 minutes, or until bread begins to brown. Remove from oven and allow cooling for ten minutes in pan before removing. Pile toast points in to a napkin lined basket or silver bread server and e assured they will add a lil crunch to the day.

Let cheese warm to room temperature. Blend all ingredients. Flavor is improved if dip is made to three hours before serving.

Mash avocados. Add sour cream, garlic powder, salt, lime juice, chopped chilies. Stir well. Add onion and tomato and stir again. If not serving immediately, place avocado pits in mx, cover and refrigerate. Pits will prevent guac from turning dark.

Beat together cream cheese, sour cream, Worcestershire, shallots parsley, garlic, salt, pepper, and liquid hot pepper seasoning. Crumble in blue cheese and mix until well distributed. Cover and chill.

The recipe and photos used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz (babzbites@gmail.com) with a lot of help from her dear friend and mentor, Ila J. Calton.

COPS AND KIDS — Picnic and open house at East End MPD station, 5:30-7 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 5, rain date Wednesday, Sept. 11. Meet MPD and MCSO officers, ride in a police car, free hot dogs, chips, drinks, dessert, free gun locks from MCSO. Open to public.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 6, 7 p.m., “American Flyers;” Sept. 7, 2 p.m., “A Wrinkle in Time,” 7 p.m., “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”

ST. PATRICK FALL FESTIVAL — Sept. 6 and 7, 6-11 p.m.; Sept. 8, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Patrick School, Maysville.

LIMESTONE CYCLING TOUR — Sept. 6 and 7, registration Friay and warm-up ride, registration and packet pickup 6 a.m., Saturday, open start 7-9 a.m., music 11 a.m.-6 p.m., awards, 4:30-5 p/m/, recovery ride Sunday 10 a.m. All events at Limestone Park-Landing.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 13, 7 p.m., “Pretty Woman;” Sept. 14, “Rocky Horror Picture Show,” 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.

FILTHY 5K — Saturday, Sept. 14, Ford Acres Farm.Registration on Facebook or at Active.com. Registration includes a T-shirt, event medal and coupons for local businesses.

SWINGTIME ON THE RIVER — Featuring “Swingtime Big Band,” Augusta Riverside Riverwalk, Saturday, Sept.14, 6:30-9:30 p.m., limited reserve seating, $12 per person or $90 per table of eight.

MISSION AEROSPACE — By Minotaur Mazes, the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center’s summer exhibit, now on display until Sept. 14, KYGMC Calvert Gallery, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 215 Sutton Street, Maysville.

UP IN THE AIR: THE HISTORY OF FLIGHT — Through Sept. 14, in the KYGMC Wormald Gallery, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 215 Sutton Street, Maysville.

SONS & DAUGHTERS OF THUNDER — Free screening with tickets, Sept. 20, Clooney Community Centr, Augusta, 7-9 p.m., hosted by ACEHA, tickets available at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movie-screening-of-sons-daughters-of-thunder-tickets-69239137123. Seating is limited.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 20, “Pink Floyd: The Wall,” 8 p.m.; Sept, 21, “Saturday Night Fever,” 7 p.m; Sept. 22, Rosemary Clooney Tribute perfromance, 3 p.m.

VFW HOUSE OF HORRORS — Every Saturday in October and Oct. 31 from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 per person. Veterans and active duty military receive free admission with a valid ID. All proceeds benefit local veterans, Simon Kenton VFW Post 2734, 3177 Kentucky 9, Maysville.

KENTUCKY GATEWAY MUSEUM CENTER presents THE OLD POGUE EXPERIENCE — Showcasing the history of Maysville’s Bourbon Industry and the Old Pogue Distillery. Exhibits in the Limestone Building,corner of Second and Sutton Streets in Downtown Maysville, Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For tickets visit KYGMC at 215 Sutton Street, Downtown Maysville. For additional information phone 606-564-5865.

Providing healthcare for the communities we serve at Meadowview Regional Medical Center and Fleming County Hospital is a 24-hours-per-day, seven-days-per-week, 365-days-per-year calling.

The Mission for both of our hospitals is “Making Communities Healthier.” We would not be able to achieve that mission without the dedication of our employees and medical providers.

This year, Labor Day falls on Sept. 2 and it is the 125th anniversary of Labor Day being celebrated as a national holiday. Labor Day is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers.

We want to thank our healthcare teams for taking great care of our communities and each other, day after day, night after night. There are emergencies, inpatient admissions, surgeries, deliveries, endoscopies, heart attacks, outpatient tests such as labs, radiology and imaging services tests, sleep studies, physical therapy, rehab services, cancer care and others that are delivered every day in our communities.

At Meadowview Regional Medical Center, we have over 400 fulltime, part time and prn clinical and nonclinical employees working alongside 200-plus medical staff providers to care for our community members. Fleming County Hospital has over 100 fulltime, part time and prn clinical and nonclinical employees working alongside 100-plus medical staff providers. We are privileged to be able to care for our neighbors, friends, family and visitors in our communities.

Sometimes within the same span of an hours’ time period, we may be helping our patients and families celebrate a joyous occasion or a personal healthcare achievement, and the very next moment, comforting a patient or family member with some healthcare news that no one ever wants to hear. Healthcare workers, along with our patients experience a full range of emotions every day of the year.

It also takes all of our team members to properly care for our patients. From our registrars, to our discharge planners and everyone in between, we count on each other to help deliver patient care services for our communities.

Working in healthcare is a challenging and very rewarding career. Each of us at some point in our lives are going to need medical care. At Meadowview Regional Medical Center and Fleming County Hospital, we have dedicated employees and medical providers who go above and beyond while caring for our patients. I am honored and proud to serve alongside our team members and community partners.

During this Labor Day holiday, I want to thank our team members for your commitment to providing compassionate, quality patient care in achieving our Mission of “Making Communities Healthier.”

This Labor Day marks the 125th Anniversary of it being celebrated as a national holiday. For those that wonder exactly what Labor Day means, here’s what I picked up from the Department of Labor’s website (www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history):

“Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.”

And, I picked this up from that same website as to the legislation for recognition and making it a legal holiday:

“The first governmental recognition came through municipal ordinances passed in 1885 and 1886. From these, a movement developed to secure state legislation. The first state bill was introduced into the New York legislature, but the first to become law was passed by Oregon on Feb. 21, 1887. During 1887, four more states – Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York – created the Labor Day holiday by legislative enactment. By the end of the decade Connecticut, Nebraska, and Pennsylvania had followed suit. By 1894, 23 more states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1894, Congress passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the territories.”

Many will see this as another opportunity for a three-day weekend, and it’s often recognized as the official end of summer where we will have family gatherings, barbeques, and final dips into the pool before preparing to close it. However, when thinking about this day and what it means, we must stop and think about the hard working men and women who make each of our companies tick.

In our case here at The Ledger Independent, there are 23 people who work together to bring you what we produce each day in print and online. Without them we’d cease to exist. What you hold in your hand is truly a “Daily Miracle” from the news and sports reporters, the sales team, the team in our Lumberton N.C facility that put our papers together, the press crew that prints and stuffs the inserts into it, and those dedicated carriers that make sure the paper hits your doorstep each day. Without their individual dedication there’d be no reporting on what’s going on in and around our area, no coverage on your favorite high school sports team, or no way to tell our audience about your businesses special sale or event. Their dedication, like many in our industry, far exceeds expectations as they are often called to go above and beyond to get their jobs done. There’s no way we could do what we do, without each of them. I salute each and every one of them and want to thank them for what they do. They make it look easy…

In this special section dedicated to Labor Day, you’ll see some articles from some of our local businesses and business leaders. I encourage you to take a few moments and read about all of the great things going on in and around our area. It is truly amazing.

Let me leave you with this quote from Martin Luther King, Jr. – “No work is insignificant. All labor that uplifts humanity has dignity and importance and should be undertaken with painstaking excellence.”

~God took the man and set him down in the Garden of Eden to work the ground and keep it in order. Genesis 2:15 (MSG)~

We were made to work; you, me, everyone. Tending, managing, overseeing, recognizing and bringing forth potential: these were all things that humankind was tasked with from the very beginning of time. Just like everything else The Lord created, work is good! I’ll give you a moment to catch your breath…

For many of us, ‘work’ is a four-letter word, both literally and figuratively. We live in a culture where work is to be avoided, not sought. The thing most-revered in our professional lives is not the amount of work we accomplish, but the amount of work we successfully dodge or delegate to someone else. We don’t care who gets stuff done, so long as it’s not us.

Work is a necessary evil, right? We dislike our superiors. We hate our job. We can’t stand our co-workers…especially the one who keeps stealing your yogurt out of the fridge. But…we need the money, so what are ya gonna do?

If you won the lottery tomorrow, what’s the first thing you’d do: buy a vacation home? New sports car? Pay off your mortgage? Set up a trust fund for your kids? Nope. Before you made your first extravagant purchase or strategized to help financially secure your children’s future there’s one thing you would take care of. You’d quit your job. We’ve all run the dream scenario through our minds. The “march-in” ala Seinfeld’s George Costanza. The lotto numbers match…let’s double-check…holy cow, they really do match…we’re rich…you print off the resignation letter…march into the corner office…slam it down on the desk…tell your boss what you really think…and walk out a legend. That’s the new American dream.

Why do half of American adults play the lotto and sit on the edge of their seat as numbered ping-pong balls pop out of the machine twice per week? Because the sad reality is that the overwhelming majority of our workforce doesn’t look forward to work or enjoy it. A 2017 Gallup poll found that 85 percent of workers surveyed are either unhappy at work, strongly disliked their work, or hated their work.

But why? Why do people hate work so much? I think there are a couple reasons. The first centers around the environmental and satisfaction aspects of our work. The second is about how we approach our work and the attitude with which we do it.

The first reason: bad bosses. A lot of folks can’t stand their boss; that is the one thing that most workers have in common. But the reason why the majority of bosses are so disliked might surprise you. Many people in leadership positions are bad at their job because they were never trained how to do it well. Nearly 60 percent of managers never received any management training according to a recent CareerBuilder survey. Most frontline supervisors and managers simply “fall up” the corporate ladder, finding themselves responsible for challenges they aren’t prepared to face.

Does this scenario sound familiar? A company who makes widgets employs 15 widget-makers. After a period of time, one widget-maker proves themselves to be a superior maker of widgets. They make more widgets, with fewer defects, and in less time than any of the other widget-makers. So what do the widget company executives do with that outstanding employee? Do they give this excellent widget-maker a raise to more accurately reflect his/her level of production comparative to the other employees? Rarely. More often than not, that widget-maker is promoted to the position of supervisor. The company has taken their most productive employee and moved them into a position where their primary objective is no longer production, but motivation and oversight. What makes companies think that excellent production employees will be excellent managerial employees? I don’t know, but most make this critical error. These positions require two exceptionally different skill sets. Yet most companies make the (incorrect) assumption that if an employee is good at a given job, they will also be good at supervising a group of people who do that same job not quite as well. Unfortunately, this rarely works out well. The newly-promoted employee is frustrated that the production employees they now supervise can’t do that job as quickly as they could. This frustration leads to bitterness and resentment from both parties and everyone suffers as a result. Production and work satisfaction fall off and no one seems to be able to figure out why.

Outstanding employees certainly should be rewarded with new challenges and career opportunities, but only when accompanied with proper training. Failing to invest in training and education of staff leads businesses to a place no one wants to go. People often say they leave jobs for more money; the truth is that’s only accurate about 12 percent of the time (The 7 Hidden Reasons Employees Leave, Branham). People don’t leave companies, they escape bad bosses. And if they can’t escape those bad bosses, they really start to hate their job.

Another reason people are so frustrated by their work is that they forget for whom they are working. They have lost their sense of purpose and no longer understand why they’re doing their job in the first place.

~Don’t just do the minimum that will get you by. Do your best. Work from the heart for your real Master, God, confident that you’ll get paid in full when you come into your inheritance. Keep in mind always that the ultimate Master you’re serving is Christ. Colossians 3:22-24 (MSG)~

We’ve forgotten why we’re working. Are we working to sustain our families? Of course. Are we working to maintain our health insurance? Sure. Do we work to cover our debt obligations? I certainly do. But these things are secondary to the real reason we work; those are simply the ancillary benefits of work that we enjoy. We engage in meaningful work because God gave us the opportunity, the health, the skill, the talent, the intelligence, and the freedom to do it. The way we take ownership in our work and the pursuit of excellence therein is an expression of appreciation to the One who blessed us with it. We work, because He who made it knew it was good for us. Our work is our worship.

People who work are (on average) happier and healthier than those who don’t. People not engaged in work have higher instances of depression, take more prescription medication, and have shorter life expectancies than those who do (FitForWork.org).

Additionally, people who are able to achieve the “dream” of financial independence from work might not be living the life you’d expect. Did you know that 70 percent of people who suddenly come into a windfall of cash will lose it within a couple years (How Winning the Lottery Makes You Miserable, Time Magazine)? And several studies have shown that almost half of all lotto winners will either file bankruptcy or commit suicide within 20 years of of their initial cash award.

The American worker is one of our nation’s greatest resources. Hard work built this country and hard work will continue to be a hallmark of the American identity. Knowing that so many folks are dissatisfied with their jobs does genuinely make me sad. However, with a few changes in perspective and attitude we can make big strides in altering the way we approach and enjoy the blessing that is our job.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor’s website, Sept. 2, 2019 is the 125th anniversary of Labor Day being celebrated as a national holiday.

The DOL website offers a brief history: The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on Sept. 5, 1883. By 1894, 23 states had adopted the holiday, and on June 28, 1894, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year a national holiday.

Presently, workforce has become one of the leading drivers for location choices. In an article from the Wharton University of Pennsylvania “The Headquarters Checklist: How Do Companies Pick A Location”, Wharton management professor Peter Cappelli, Director of the School’s Center for Human Resources states: “For most businesses, the issue of location choice now is driven by labor: Will we be able to attract the white-collar skills we need? For unskilled or semi-skilled jobs, will we be able to get it at a price we want to pay? No business goes to the Silicon Valley or New York City because it is cheap; they go because of the labor supply.” Christopher Thornberg, founding partner of Los Angeles economics research firm Beacon Economics, further strengthens this thought, “It boils down to access to clients, access to labor force, access to suppliers – these all play a role in these decisions.”

Just as it was important to start the celebration of the workforce in 1882, the importance of the available workforce in site selection has made it even more vital and worthy of continued celebration.

The Maysville-Mason County Area Chamber of Commerce believes that Workforce is the heart of everything we do. It begins with our Mission Statement: “To enhance economic growth, promote development and provide leadership of the business community in the Maysville-Mason County Area”. That may still sound rather general, but that’s the beauty of it – the Chamber can move in almost any area where our membership has a need. To simplify it, we can break it down to three words, Enhance, Promote and Lead. But my favorite way to describe the Chamber is that we are a Connector. We can connect one person to another, or someone to the information or product that they need.

It has been a pleasure to provide the leadership for the process of becoming certified as a Kentucky Work Ready Community. We had the opportunity to prove that Mason County has the quality workforce employers are looking for. Our workforce has graduated from high school, has some college experience to a two-year or higher degree, and has attained Career Readiness Certificates. The Chamber, in conjunction with the Mason County School System, has developed the Work Ethic Seal Program to reward Mason County Juniors and Seniors for exhibiting the habits employers look for in an employee. One of the best outcomes of the program has been connecting all the stakeholders needed for the process: Economic Development, Business and Industry, Elected Officials, Education, Workforce Development and those who work with the Veteran, Disabled, Ex-offender, and Medicaid Populations. It takes all of us working together!

Always looking to the future, we partner with (enhance) and actively serve on committees for the Kentucky Career Center, Business Services Team and Maysville Community and Technical College. We produce (promote) a Relocation Guide to use when talking with new businesses or to help a new resident navigate settling in the area. We also produce the Maysville/Mason County map to help us all find our way around. We were a founding sponsor of the Maysville Young Professionals Network and continue to support them as they provide a connection to our new, younger residents. We regularly provide Professional Development opportunities (lead) such as our Exceeding Customer Expectations seminar on Sept. 26 and our Annual Leadership Conference. The Chamber helped to start the Leadership Horizons program which has continued for 20 years. We are proud to be a part of the steering committee to make Maysville the First Green Dot City and have had a couple of opportunities to represent Maysville at the State level.

Everything we do supports our workforce. It doesn’t matter if the business is along the river or on top of the hill, or if they have one employee or 600, our goal is to connect them to the resources that are needed.

On this 125th Labor Day, let’s all take a moment to thank each other for the great job everyone does. Truly, “Big things are happening in Maysville” and we have our workforce to thank for it.

For many, Labor Day Weekend conjures up warm imagery of grill-outs, extended time with friends and family and the shortening days of summer. According to the Department of Labor, “Labor Day constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.”

While there is nothing wrong with the positive imagery most of us have grown to associate with Labor Day, I would charge that the holiday marks the perfect time to reflect on our community’s economic wellbeing, both locally and regionally, and how lucky we are individually to call Maysville and Mason County home.

While Maysville’s economy historically weathers national economic trauma better than most similarly sized communities, it is not too difficult to remember the tumultuous times of 2008 recession, the housing crisis and overall economic calamity the nation endured. Locally, one doesn’t need to strain too much to remember the days of closing power plants, double-digit unemployment, empty stores and long commutes for low wages in other cities endured by Maysville residents. While as unpleasant as it may be to remember those precarious days, it serves to remind us how far we have come.

Today, Maysville has ascended back to the regional 14-county hub we historically have been. Over the last two years, our community has announced cutting-edge manufacturing companies such as Enviroflight, PatienTech and Precision Pulley and Idler (PPI), each representing unimaginable economic potential . Maysville hosted Carlson Software’s Annual Conference that brought software and mining engineers as well as other cutting edge technology representatives from numerous countries here. Industrial stalwarts such as Mitsubishi, Green Tokei and others have rarely been better. Stober Drives, while also synonymous with innovation and manufacturing excellence, has developed into a national leader in apprenticeships and workforce development. International Paper continues to prosper, employing more and more residents everyday while EKPC’s Spurlock Power Station recently announced a quarter-billion dollar investment, easily ensuring their productivity and viability for next 25 years. Moreover, large, big box retail stores such as Harbor Freight, Rural King and others have opened Maysville operations and are prospering with several other national stores currently exploring our community. For area workers, local and regional unemployment is virtually non-existent in that today, if you want a job and are willing to obtain the skills needed, local employers desperately want to speak with you.

The above picture does not even include tourism in Maysville and Mason County. While The Kentucky Gateway Museum Center, Old Pogue Distillery and B-Line immediately come to mind, the City of Maysville has made significant strides with downtown revitalization with the downtown entertainment district as well as the Second and Third Street construction projects. This progress is best exemplified by the fact that more buildings in downtown Maysville have transitioned ownership in the last two years than the previous 15. Businesses in downtown Maysville are working to form a Downtown Merchants Association to more effectively coordinate and capitalize on these investments that will soon lead to Downtown Maysville Focus Weekends with additional entertainment options for Maysville and Mason County citizens. All of the above developments have led to hotel occupancy rates that have never been higher in Maysville and Mason County, statistics that will only lead to attracting additional hotel investments.

For me, the Labor Day holiday and our overall economic health is best exemplified in the Martins’ Small Engines, the Local 68 Store, Maysville Brewery, C&S Oil, Sprinkles of Hope, Elementz, M’s Eatery and other small shops and businesses. While the announcement of a 300-employee cutting edge manufacturer is always reason to celebrate, the fact that our community is mentoring and fostering so many small business start-ups is possibly the most important and significant sign of our overall economic health and well-being. The fact that owners and proprietors of these small businesses are confident and courageous enough to travel their own entrepreneurial path tells me things are well in Maysville and Mason County, Kentucky.

While each of us, as citizens and residents of Maysville, can easily fall into the trappings of our day-to-day lives and fail to see the forest for the trees, I think the Labor Day holiday marks the perfect time to evaluate how far our community has come and the positive economic momentum we have developed. Taken on the whole, our community is growing well and we should appreciate the fact we call Maysville home.

Over the holiday, take some time to appreciate how far we have come and the many allied economic and workforce development partners we have in our area working hard to better our community. Appreciate the fact that the local relationship between City of Maysville and Mason County representatives has never been stronger with solid leadership, open doors and a willingness to work together for the betterment of local citizens and our economy as a whole. Furthermore, state leaders are keeping Maysville and Mason County on the forefront of their minds when thinking about potential, opportunities, and projects, evidenced by the fact that Governor Bevin’s administration held a full cabinet meeting here in Maysville just a few short months ago and numerous visits from individual state cabinet representatives to Maysville.

At the Maysville-Mason County Industrial Development Authority, we field calls every day from business and industry executives exploring options to open operations in Maysville and Mason County indicating and underscoring the fact that we are moving the needle locally. Over this Labor Day weekend holiday, I hope you will join me in thinking about the many positive attributes our community has to offer, how far our local economy has come and what “Big things are happening in Maysville, Kentucky.”

In a January 2017 survey by the Associated General Contractors of America, 73 percent of businesses stated they had a difficult time finding qualified workers. American schools and communities unfortunately are not producing skilled workers at a rate to keep up with the demand of our economy, leaving many businesses unable to grow. The shortage of skills and talent is projected to become more acute in years to come. With shortages in skills and talent at record highs in most businesses in America, Apprenticeships have become a popular topic of conversation when searching for solutions.

In fiscal year 2016, DOL counted about 500,000 active apprentices in more than 21,000 registered apprenticeship programs in America. Of the 130 million full time employees in USA, that makes up only 0.4% of the workforce. That equates to about 5% of High School graduates in America entering apprenticeship programs. Compare that to Germany, which has about 1.4 million apprentices, or about 5.5% of its workforce in the form of apprenticeships, which equates to 50% of German High School graduates entering apprenticeships. America is clearly far behind, and the risk to the American economy posed by the skills shortage is great.

Defining apprenticeships is very important, as there are many ideas and misconceptions surrounding this form of education. An apprenticeship is an arrangement in which you get hands-on training, technical instruction, and a paycheck—all at the same time. Apprentices work for a sponsor, such as an individual employer or a business-union partnership, who pays their wages and provides the training. Formal apprenticeship programs usually last about 4 years, depending on the employer or occupation. Many of these programs are registered with the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), or a state Department of Labor. At the end of a registered apprenticeship program, apprentices get a nationally recognized certificate of completion as proof of their skills

The earliest apprenticeship beginnings in America date back to the 1600s in New England under an indenture system, in which the student was under the care a master, even living with them, dependent upon the master for food and clothing as well as shelter, not always under good conditions. With the expansion of industry following the industrial revolution in the 1900s. Compensation was changed by employers to the payment of wages. The term “master,” however, was continued in some trades, and “master machinist” and “master plumber” are still familiar terms.

There are barriers to overcome if the number of Apprenticeships in America are to grow significantly, especially in small to medium sized businesses. First, Americans are individual achiever, we believe in “every man (company, organization) for himself”. That presents a problem when an initiative relies on collaboration between many entities, like a community establishing apprenticeship programs. Secondly, Americans have really pushed the 4-year college education as the only “path to success” for young people over the last 30 years with the dual track learning path losing its popularity. Third, businesses very often look at employees as an expense, in fact, personnel cost is listed as an expense in business income statements. Investments are assets and the accounting is tracked in business balance sheets. If people are considered an expense in a company rather than an investment, the company will not start an apprenticeship program. CEOs and CFOs need to mentally move personnel from the income statement to the balance sheet. Finally, infrastructure to support apprenticeships is very underdeveloped in America: High Schools teachers and counselors do not promote apprenticeships; they are mostly not even aware of them. Community Colleges typically do not have curriculum established to support the apprenticeships of local businesses. Few standards of performance are established at the state or local level to reference. Government tax credits and grants to support a company with their apprenticeship programs may be available, but it is up to the company to find out what is available and then navigate the process of receiving this support. Many small to medium sized companies simply do not have the skill set and capacity to work through all these infrastructure barriers.

Apprenticeships are not a substitute for a 4-year college education by any means, that Is the right path for many High School graduates. But for many, they are a very viable alternative, consider the statistics: 70% of Americans enter a 4-year bachelors’ program after High School. Of those, only 57% are finished after 6 years, and 33% drop out altogether. Many leaving colleges, with our without graduating, carry with them a large amount of college debt. Currently there is $1.2 trillion in outstanding student debt in America, the highest debt category behind mortgage debt. The average student debt in America is $29,800. Those that do graduate, typically enter the workforce with little or no work experience, something employers value highly.

For young people just starting out in the world of work, apprenticeship has important advantages. It offers an efficient way to learn skills, for the training is planned and organized and is not hit-or-miss. The apprentices earn as they learn, for they are already workers. When their apprenticeship is completed, youth are assured of a secure future and a good standard of living because the training is in the crafts where skills are much in demand. Opportunities for employment and advancement open with the recognition that the apprentices are now skilled craft workers.

With apprentices earning a good wage while getting great hands-on job experience and earning 48 credit hours or even an associate’s degree, they are well prepared to enter the job market upon completion of their apprenticeship, and they can easily continue their education, often getting their bachelor’s degree paid by their employer in the form of tuition reimbursement.

For employers, having apprentices as part of their employee pool, a pipeline of skills and talent is assured. At STOBER, for instance, the goal is to always have 7-10 percent of the employee population in the form of apprentices, covering all job disciplines

For educational institutions, especially local community colleges, apprenticeships provide a new enrollment opportunity. Partnering with businesses also helps colleges stay in touch with the careers that are relevant in their communities, so that the colleges enroll and graduate students in fields with good job opportunities.

For communities, apprentices who find good companies to work for, typically stay in those communities and raise their families, and earn more than if they went straight to work from High School. So, tax revenue rises, and the tax burden of social programs for the unemployed is reduced

There is a lot at stake as America struggles to produce the skills and talent it will need to sustain our position as the strongest economy in the world. Both Europe and in Asia are generating more skilled young people than we are.

So…Just Do It! CEOs, start apprenticeship programs in your company. You will improve both your top and bottom lines long-term, as well as improve your company brand and reputation as a developer of people. Moms and Dads, consider and apprenticeship for little Jane or Johnny. It may just be the best way for them to launch on their career path, earning as they go, getting hand-on job experiencing, and likely finishing their associate degree with zero debt. Government, provide incentives to businesses in the form of grants and tax credits, the investment will pay itself back many times over as the associate stays in your community, earns a wage or salary and pays taxes. Community colleges, partner with businesses to provide the formal learning portion of the apprenticeship, you will increase enrollment and stay relevant for the businesses in your community, as well as supporting the growth of young people in a very attractive alternative to the 4-year bachelors program, the apprenticeship.

Thursday night a friend asked me to come down to her restaurant and help prepare food for a 250 person wedding we would both attend on Saturday. I arrived expecting us to throw on aprons, bust out cutting boards and slice and dice veggies til the moon was looking down at us laughing. I had it completely wrong.

When I arrived, the restaurant was packed with guests. As I walked closer to the back of the space, I could see two small tables pushed together with large three to five gallon buckets on them and surrounding the chairs around the table. A few friends were sitting at the table already, green beans piled up to the top of the buckets forming small but vast mountains.

Like many of you reading today, some of my favorite memories have been sitting on the porch snapping green beans. I’d usually snap with my grandmother Nan-Nan, her feeble wrinkly hands moving at twice the pace my fingers could. Even the summer before her death, we were still snapping beans and she was still leaving me in her green bean dust.

When I sat down with my friends I realized I hadn’t snapped with anyone since NanNan, it had just been by myself hunched over the kitchen counter. It made me realize I had the green bean game all wrong. Green beans aren’t meant to be snapped alone, they are a group activity and meant to be shared not just on the dinner table.

We snapped off the stems and snapped them in half, bean after bean. We were all a little competitive but there were so many beans it was hard to say who was the fastest. I’d like to think it was me, but we each had a different technique for gathering, snapping, and throwing in the bucket. I couldn’t keep up with who was throwing what where and how long each mountain of beans was in each spot. The piles kept coming and coming.

By the time we were finished we were all giddy from smelling the sweet bean juice on our hands, faces hurting from the laughter, and slightly disappointed there weren’t more to snap. I asked what was next and was told that was it. That was it? That was the cooking we were doing? But then I remembered standing over the sink by myself, snapping green beans, and realized if this had been a one person job it would’ve taken all night.

A staple on the summertime plate, fresh green beans taste like home to me. I’ve included a few traditional and non-traditional ways to eat green beans in today’s article. I’ve also included my favorite, southern style green beans which we made for the wedding on Saturday. One of my favorite aspects of green beans, most everybody likes them. They are always great for potlucks, leftovers, a quick fix, or just a meal of veggies. The sesame green beans are probably my second favorite, and add a different crunch to your plate. Give them all a whirl and see which is your favorite.

Season: All year. But best harvested when they are young, before strings form. Look for: Crisp, tender, long beans without scars.

To prepare: Rinse in cold water. Snap off ends so that string connecting ends comes off with stem end. Leave whole or snap into bite sized pieces. To cook: Allow 1 cup per side dish. Always cook in an uncovered pan to prevent beans from going yellow. The proportions are 4 cups of water per 1 1/2 cups beans and 1 1/2 teaspoons salt. For al dente beans, simmer for 10 minutes; for very tender beans, simmer for 15-20 minutes. Do not overcook or they will become mushy.

1 medium Vidalia onion, diced (Any white onion may be used, but if you wanna make it southern, keep it sweet.)

1 1/2 cups low-sodium chicken broth or water Salt and pepper to taste 2 pounds small red or new potatoes, halved with peels kept on

If using bacon: In a Dutch oven or large pot over medium heat, cook bacon until crisp. Transfer bacon with a slotted spoon to paper towels to cool. Leave bacon fat in pan.

Add diced or sliced onion to the bacon fat or to butter or olive oil. Cook over medium heat for 2-3 minutes, or until onion softens.

Add green beans, chicken stock or water, salt and pepper. Add ham if using. Stir together. Lower heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 30 minutes. Add potatoes, cover, and simmer for another 30 minutes or until potatoes are done. Potatoes may also be cooked in a separate pot or baked in the oven and added if you are short on time. You will know the potato is done when the fork slides in and out of it easily.

Heat a 12 inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add oil, beans and sauté for 15 minutes or until slightly caramelized and crusty. Don’t burn, so stir frequently. Reduce heat and add garlic. Cook for two more minutes. Transfer to a serving bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately or at room temperature. Also delicious on a salad.

Grease an ovenproof dish with butter. Cook beans in boiling, salted water for 15 minutes. Drain and place in greased dish. In a separate bowl, beat eggs, milk, Parmesan, salt, and pepper. Pour the mix over the beans and bake until just set (Check after 10 minutes. May need another 5-10.) Serve immediately.

In boiling water, cook beans for ten minutes, drain and set aside. Melt butter in a pan on low heat. Add scallions, stirring occasionally, until butter is softened (about five minutes). Stir lemon juice and rind, add beans and season with salt and pepper. Simmer for ten more minutes. White beans cook, in a small frying pan on low heat, dry fry the sesame seeds for about 2 minutes or until they begin to smell toasted and look toasted. Transfer beans to a warm serving dish. Sprinkle with sesame seeds and drizzle with oil. Mix and serve immediately. Also delicious served chilled.

Cook onion and parsley in butter until tender, but not brown. Add flour, salt, pepper and lemon peel. Add sour cream and mix well. Stir in beans and mushrooms. Place in a 7×11 inch casserole. Top with grated cheese. Combine bread crumbs and melted butter. Sprinkle mix on top of green beans. Bake at 350 for 30 minutes.

The photo and recipe used in today’s article are from the kitchen of Chef Babz (BabzBites@gmail.com) with a little help from The Silver Spoon, Editoriale Domus, 1997 and The Good Housekeeping Cookbook, Zoe Cousin, 1973.

FARM TO TABLE EVENT — Friday, Aug. 30, in celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Mays Lick Mill. Proceeds to support the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center’s Limestone Project. Social Hour 6 p.m., dinner 7 p.m., May’s Lick Mill, US 68, May’s Lick. Tickets available at Kentucky Gateway Museum Center or any Hinton Mills location, $75 per person, couple $125. For additional information or reservations call 606-564-5865.

HINTON MILLS MAY’S LICK — 5oth anniversary celebration, Aug. 31 and Sept. 1, Saturday, 5:30-10:30 p.m., hayride, corn maze, pony rides, face painting, touch-a-truck with Hinton Mills equipment, farm-focused kids’ games, inflatables, and cane pole fishing, live music from Baylee Morgan and David Austin, Fenced In, and Night Flyer, fireworks show by Rozzi Fireworks; Suday, tent church service 9:30 a.m.

AUGUSTA HERITAGE DAYS — Aug 30.-Sept. 1, presented by the Augusta Rotary Club. A weekend of vendors, food, music, car show, live duck race, Sunday afternoon frog derby and much more; dedication of Fort Ancient marker 10 a.m., city park.

COPS AND KIDS — Picnic and open house at East End MPD station, 5:30-7 p.m., rain date Wednesday, Sept. 11. Meet MPD and MCSO officers, ride in a police car, free hot dogs, chips, drinks, dessert, free gun locks from MCSO. Open to public.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 6, 7 p.m., “American Flyers;” Sept. 7, 2 p.m., “A Wrinkle in Time,” 7 p.m., “Raiders of the Lost Ark.”

ST. PATRICK FALL FESTIVAL — Sept. 6 and 7, 6-11 p.m.; Sept. 8, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., St. Patrick School, Maysville.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 13, 7 p.m., “Pretty Woman;” Sept. 14, “Rocky Horror Picture Show,” 7 p.m. and 10 p.m.

FILTHY 5K — Saturday, Sept. 14, Ford Acres Farm.Registration on Facebook or at Active.com. Registration includes a T-shirt, event medal and coupons for local businesses.

SWINGTIME ON THE RIVER — Featuring “Swingtime Big Band,” Augusta Riverside Riverwalk, Saturday, Sept.14, 6:30-9:30 p.m., limited reserve seating, $12 per person or $90 per table of eight.

MISSION AEROSPACE — By Minotaur Mazes, the Kentucky Gateway Museum Center’s summer exhibit, now on display until Sept. 14, KYGMC Calvert Gallery, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 215 Sutton Street, Maysville.

UP IN THE AIR: THE HISTORY OF FLIGHT — Through Sept. 14, in the KYGMC Wormald Gallery, Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 215 Sutton Street, Maysville.

SONS & DAUGHTERS OF THUNDER — Free screening with tickets, Sept. 20, Clooney Community Centr, Augusta, 7-9 p.m., hosted by ACEHA, tickets available at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/movie-screening-of-sons-daughters-of-thunder-tickets-69239137123. Seating is limited.

RUSSELL THEATRE — Sept. 20, “Pink Floyd: The Wall,” 8 p.m.; Sept, 21, “Saturday Night Fever,” 7 p.m; Sept. 22, Rosemary Clooney Tribute perfromance, 3 p.m.

VFW HOUSE OF HORRORS — Every Saturday in October and Oct. 31 from 8 p.m. to midnight. Cost is $5 per person. Veterans and active duty military receive free admission with a valid ID. All proceeds benefit local veterans, Simon Kenton VFW Post 2734, 3177 Kentucky 9, Maysville.

KENTUCKY GATEWAY MUSEUM CENTER presents THE OLD POGUE EXPERIENCE — Showcasing the history of Maysville’s Bourbon Industry and the Old Pogue Distillery. Exhibits in the Limestone Building,corner of Second and Sutton Streets in Downtown Maysville, Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. For tickets visit KYGMC at 215 Sutton Street, Downtown Maysville. For additional information phone 606-564-5865.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 KENTUCKY BOYS SOCCER Fleming County 1, West Carter 0 Pendleton County 2, Mason County 0 Scott 5, St. Patrick 1 GIRLS GOLF Lewis County vs Nicholas County at Laurel Oaks, no scores […]

Ron Ladina touches up details on the Parc Cafe Thursday. Ron and his Brother Rick Ladina have done much of the elaborate woodworking both inside and outside the Carlson Software Building over the past years. […]

Trees that line the lake at the Maysville-Mason County Recreation Park Thursday are beginning to show some fall colors as a walker makes his way around the lake with his canine campanion. https://maysville-online.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/web1_091319-news-fall.jpg

Mason County property transfers Connie S. Staggs and Mason County to Security Bank and Trust Co., a lot of land on Forest Avenue, no monetary consideration. Leah A. Frederick to Leah A. Frederick, a lot […]

Throwback Thursday pic is of the old Fleming County gym aka (The Swimming Pool), which was one of the most unique gyms anywhere. When a player checked into the game, the player would have to […]

BROOKSVILLE — A public hearing has been set for the community to hear about and discuss the changes to the county administrative code. The hearing will be held at 12:30 p.m. on Sept. 25. The […]

BROOKSVILLE — A milling and resurfacing project is currently underway in Bracken County. According to Nancy Wood, public information officer for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, the work is taking place between Kentucky 19 and Main […]

Mason County Fiscal Court approved an agreement to provide cardboard to International Paper during a regular meeting on Tuesday. According to Mason County Judge-Executive Joe Pfeffer, the county had been sending bulk recycled paper to […]

Nice statue, nice park I would like to thank Bruce for the very nice statue of Simon Kenton; the Kentons were my ancestors. The Limestone Park is also very nice.

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