Superchargers have been around for decades and have provided a valid alternative to turbocharging. Instead of the conventional mechanical turbocharger, is it preferable to have electronically controlled forced-induction? There’s nothing quite like a supercharger whine. That high-pitched shriek from the belt-driven mesh as it compresses air into the cylinders is one of our most loved sounds as petrolheads. Almost seen as a ‘bolt on’ application, some of the greatest powertrains ever made have been supercharged, be it Jaguar’s V8, the 5.4-litre engine from the Mustang GT500 or the 638bhp motor from the Corvette ZR1. Although Formula One has come along and used electric motors for turbocharging purposes, electric superchargers have also been floating around the internet as a possible modification in the last few years. So how do they work? There are two types of electric supercharger. The first is more of a fan than specifically a supercharger. Attached directly to the inlet manifold, the cylindrical component acts basically as a desk fan, sucking air into the intake and then forcing it into the cylinders. You can find plenty of these contraptions on the Internet but it is essentia...